Beware – knitting content!

Last November, some of us local knitters ventured forth into the wide wide world that exists out there beyond the computer and went on a Safari, organised by wonderful Peri. I was quite restrained in my purchases that day (mainly due to having to spend most of my money on cake for myslaves daughters), but I did a bit of judicious swapping with Jan and scored a couple of skeins of her hand-dyed sock yarn. One skein is still waiting to see what it will become, but the other has been pressed into service:

Socks

Socks

and

Hat with twirl

Hat with twirl

and

Cutie bootees

Cutie bootees

all from one 420m skein! There’s enough left to make a cover for a mobile phone too.

The socks are a basic toe-up with gusset construction, which I am becoming more and more fond of as I seem to be able to get a better finish. The hat is a simple short-row construction with a garter stitch border picked up round the edge afterwards, and a twirly bit on top. The bootees are, of course, Saartje’s bootees, pattern available free from her blog.

In case you were wondering about the model for the hat and bootees, don’t worry, I haven’t had a baby in secret, it’s actually a very old doll called Susie.

She's not really this scary-looking

She's not really this scary-looking

Susie was my very favourite doll when I was a little girl, but she’s a lot older than me and has undergone some rather drastic surgery. She originally belonged to my mum, who won her in a “guess the name” competition some time in the mid-forties (the winning name was Prudence!) and she was a thoroughly modern marvel – she walked if you held her hand and she said “mama” if you tipped her upside-down (an unnecessary cruelty, in my view). She also had baby-blue eyes and rather alarming ginger hair in a complicated style of rolls and ringlets. Mum was way past the age of playing with dolls when she won Prudence, so she carefully stored her away along with her printed rayon dresses, frilly knickers, little cotton socks and plastic Mary-Jane shoes. Fast-forward to the early sixties when the doll was presented to a littler and younger me: Prudence became Susie, the shoes were lost (or possibly stolen by my brother, but I have no proof), the hair became matted and some of it fell off, the eyes were poked out and the talkie thingy stopped working (water-logged after a dunk in the paddling pool, I think). But I LOVED Susie and persuaded mum and dad to send her to the dolly hospital, where her eyes were replaced with dark brown ones and her beautiful ginger tresses were replaced with a short blonde mop which looked as though it had had a shampoo and set (in concrete). Eventually, of course, Susie was relegated to the back of the toy cupboard and forgotten about, but she came with me when I got married (and later, divorced) and was played with  a little bit by my own daughters, too (although they did not play with dolls very much and found her rather scary). She is now in a rather sorry state as the walking mechanism is broken and her left leg dangles as though she has had a stroke (her head came right off at one point, but we needn’t discuss that here…). She is made of a very rigid plastic and has never been a cuddly sort of doll, but even now with all her faults, I cannot bear to part with her.

Almost forgot, there’s been some spinnning, too:

Lovely purple

Lovely purple

Blue faced Leicester humbug, hand dyed by BabyLongLegs and bought at the UK Rav day in Coventry last month.

Spun on my Louet Victoria at highest ratio, then navajo-plied.

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “Beware – knitting content!

  1. Lovely spun yarn. I love BabyLongLegs colours, she has such a good eye.

  2. Nice job with that yarn. So many projects!!! And, as someone who sleeps with a tattered teddy bear whose head is held in place by one loose thread, I cannot judge Susie. In fact, I find her rather charming. She is also a fabulous model!

  3. I love the sock yarn, and the little booties and hat! Susie is completely terrifying though!

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